Intel Creates Compute Card

So Intel’s making a new thing that will shoot us another step into the future:

a Compute Card

Isn’t it great? It’s just a little computer, all in a tiny little thing that could fit in your palm.

It’s like any smartphone out on the market, just without a screen, and with much better specs. What are it’s uses? Well let me tell you:

The American education system has made great strides in technology over the past couple decades.

I part of the small group of people who went through public school right as the internet started becoming popular. Back in these days, we were 9/11 fresh, and Fall out Boy was just starting their world domination, cell phones were new, weird technology, overhead projectors were giving way to “Elmo” projectors, which was just an over-sized webcam.

Whatever, my point is that this age has been especially kind to the education system, allowing for complete connection of all students and teachers along one entire network of storage. Physical notes began to lose all sense of meaning as computers started taking over and no one wanted to write anything anymore. There are actually a lot of places now where a school will give you a laptop, or an iPad that you only use for school, and is payed for by the school. They automatically connect you to their inter-internet so that you have access to basically everything you need in terms of papers and assignments and information on a course.

Really, it kind of eliminated the need for real textbooks, or physical handouts. University classes consist mainly of one lecture followed by a syllabus and five readings you have to read before the final exam.

Alright, okay then, but why the hell am I saying all of this? What does this have to do with anything? Well, let’s go back to talking about the Compute Card. It’s an entire computer: processor, ram, storage, OS, all inside of the small shell that makes it almost like a card. The main thing about it is that it’s crazy mobile, you can fit it in your pocket no problem. And It’s not like a dinky little s**t of a computer either, it’s actually basically on par with a lot of netbooks out there, except it can be plugged in anywhere with a screen and a keyboard and mouse and it’ll be ready to go.

Of course this will be great for businesses and things like transporting files and such and it’s even a step in the direction of providing every person with a personal device with their entire life’s information on it just for identification purposes. But my mind went to schools and education, why? Well, the freedom you have with a tiny mobile computer is that you can give a child one to keep all their personal files on for school, and then you don’t need to set up computers everywhere in the school for public use, you can just have a bunch of stations set up where every kid will have a screen with a keyboard and mouse to control their own personal Compute Card. It’s not exceptionally powerful, so it’s not too expensive with the price being estimated as low as $140 going up to as much as $450 depending on the model you choose.

Yes, there are going to be a range of units with processors ranging from an Intel Celeron/Pentium to an i5/m3, and storage from 64 GB to 128 GB. Schools can just get the cheaper versions since kids shouldn’t be doing much on them in the way of school work, you get them back, wipe them at the end of the year, and give them to the next round of kids. It really cuts back on wear and tear like having fifty kids sign on to one machine in a day, and especially considering the only interaction kids can have with them is downloading stuff onto them.

I’m not completely sure what to make of this anyways, it’s a weird new technology and I like it. Sometimes the most unassuming things can change life in unexpected ways.

So what do you think about the Compute Card?

Leave a comment down below and like the post if you did!

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